Nancy Pelosi speaks about husband’s attack as buzz begins about her daughter replacing her in Congress

In her first public remarks made since her husband was attacked last week, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi expressed gratitude for the support she’s received, read a poem from a famous Israeli poet, and called for unity — and shockingly, she did all this without demonizing Republicans like the president has been doing.

The only problem was that her message lacked any introspection. After all, her own daughter once celebrated a Republican senator having his ribs broken. The same daughter, in fact, who’s reportedly poised to succeed Pelosi one day.

Regardless, the House speaker offered her unexpected unity take in a video posted both to Twitter and YouTube on Friday after her husband came home from the hospital.

Watch:

“It is with a grateful heart that I thank you for being here, coming together this morning. Usually, we’re [here] Wednesday, but Paul came home yesterday. That enables me to be at home with all of you,” she said.

“Thank you, thank you, thank you for your kind words, your prayers, and your good wishes for Paul. It’s going to be a long haul, but he will be well, and it’s just so tragic how it happened. But nonetheless, we have to be optimistic. He’s surrounded by family, so that is a wonderful thing,” Pelosi added.

She proceeded to read a poem from a famous Israeli poet Ehud Manor.

“I’ve read it before. I read it after what happened on January 6th. I am not reading the whole poem, but from it: ‘I have no other country, although my land is burning. My veins, my soul with an aching body and with a hungry heart, here is my home. I will not be silent for my country has changed her face. I will not give up on her. I shall remind her and sing into her ears until she opens her eyes,” she said.

Pelosi concluded her remarks by calling for unity.

“But it is a country. We need to bring our country together. So when we are fighting this fight, getting out this vote, let’s do so with the greatest respect for everyone,” she said.

“So again, I have always said that the arts would bring us together, and that is why I quoted that poem. Because we can be inspired, we can laugh, we can cry, we can be inspired, we can share common thoughts and ground, forget our differences. And I find that to be the saving grace,” the speaker added.

The problem, critics say, is that there was no introspection. Unity would be nice indeed, but it’d require acknowledging the bad tendencies on both sides of the aisle, including hers.

It’d specifically require acknowledging that her own daughter once celebrated Sen. Rand Paul, a Republican, being brutally beaten by his neighbor:

FYI, her daughter has never once apologized for the tweet. Instead she just silently deleted it after posting it two years ago.

Her daughter’s behavior matters because she’s reportedly poised to take over for Pelosi one day.

Christine Pelosi, a Democratic activist who has served as a surrogate for her mother, is widely expected to pursue the seat if it opens,” according to Politico.

“While she has made no public statements that could even be construed as an acknowledgment of her intentions, she regularly comments on social media and is active in Democratic Party affairs. She declined requests to comment about the future race for the seat, adding that she could talk after the November election,” the outlet reported Friday.

The going theory is that Pelosi may permanently bow out of politics if a red wave sweeps Congress next week and she’s ousted from the speakership.

If that happens, Christine is seen as one of two likely replacements because she “embodies the speaker’s politics, publicly championing Democrats’ agenda while advocating for women and pushing the party to emphasize climate change and support for veterans.”

In other words, she’s a far-leftist just like her mom:

And she’s got the connections.

“Christine Pelosi’s party activism, Capitol Hill ties and work training emerging female leaders have helped her build a network of political players — some of whom could become allies in a House race,” according to Politico.

“The more people you are connected with, absolutely the better you’re served if you’re trying to do something else. Having those connections, let me call so-and-so and see what they think, that becomes politically important,” Carolyn Fowler, the current Women’s Caucus chair, said to the outlet.

Of course, Christine taking over is predicated on her mother stepping down. Will that actually happen, though? Nobody currently knows, though Pelosi’s past rhetoric suggests she will indeed.

“Nancy Pelosi announced on Wednesday that she will step down as top Democrat in the House by 2022 in a deal with Democratic lawmakers pushing for generational change. The deal secures her the votes she needs to become speaker of the House in January,” BuzzFeed reported in late 2018.

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Vivek Saxena

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