Brooklyn hotel hosting Hinkley gig claims would-be assassin ‘didn’t f— up’ as many lives as Reagan WH

Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE


A left-wing Brooklyn hotel is facing scrutiny over its fierce defense of John Hinckley Jr., the man who tried assassinating then-President Ronald Reagan in 1982 and, in the process, severely wounded the then-president and left his assistant, James Brady, paralyzed and permanently stuck in a wheelchair.

The drama over Hinckley is related to his status as some sort of musical star. Ever since his release from a psychiatric facility in 2016, he’s been posting videos to YouTube of himself playing a guitar and singing — and apparently, people find this charming.

Indeed, last weekend Hinckley posted a tweet touting his “upcoming show” at “Market Hotel in Brooklyn NY” and claimed, “ticket sales are good.”

He wasn’t kidding about ticket sales. According to VenuePilot, as of Thursday morning the concert at Market Hotel was sold out.

Look:

(Source: VenuePilot)

In response to Hinckley’s tweet, one Twitter user slammed Market Hotel, saying they should “cancel” the concert, and asked, “what are you thinking.”

Look:

The user’s response was likely motivated by all the harm that Hinckley’s actions on March 30th, 1981 had caused.

“John W. Hinckley Jr. shot Reagan, White House press secretary James Brady and two officers outside a Washington hotel on March 30, 1981, less than two months into Reagan’s presidency. Reagan suffered a punctured lung and internal bleeding and nearly died of his injuries,” according to The Washington Post.

By August, Reagan was publicly claiming that he’d fully recovered, but according to the History channel, “in private … he would continue to feel the effects of the nearly fatal gunshot wound for years.”

“Of the [other] victims of the assassination attempt, Secret Service agent Timothy McCarthy and D.C. policeman Thomas Delahanty eventually recovered. James Brady, who nearly died after being shot in the eye, suffered permanent brain damage,” the History channel further notes.

The brain damage was severe enough that Brady was “left with slurred speech and paralysis that required him to use a wheelchair for the rest of his life,” according to AL.com.

Upon Brady’s death 33 years later on Aug. 4th, 2014, his death was ruled a homicide connected to the 1981 shooting, though Hinckley was never charged for it.

Despite Hinckley’s twisted history, Market Hotel responded to the Twitter user’s question by defending him.

Look:

This defense attracted criticism, but in response to the criticism, Market Hotel chose to try and mock the critic with an ad hominem attack.

Look:

In response to the latter tweet, Market Hotel chose to talk trash about Reagan, a man considered by many to have been one of America’s greatest presidents.

“Hinckley didn’t f–k up a billionth as many lives as the Reagan admin did. And Hinckley at least faced some comeuppance for what he did. He served 40 years, acknowledged his actions, expressed remorse, was out of his mind incapacitated when he did his crimes and got treatment,” the hotel wrote.

The tweet has since been deleted, but a screenshot remains:

(Source: Wayback Machine)

In responding to another critic, the Market Hotel seemed to reveal that it’s a left-wing organization.

Observe:

See more criticism of the hotel below:

As for Hinckley’s YouTube account, it may be accessed below:

DONATE TO AMERICAN WIRE

If you are fed up with letting radical big tech execs, phony fact-checkers, tyrannical liberals and a lying mainstream media have unprecedented power over your news please consider making a donation to American Wire News to help us fight them.

Thank you for your donation!
Vivek Saxena

Comment

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, profanity, vulgarity, doxing, or discourteous behavior. If a comment is spam, instead of replying to it please click the ∨ icon below and to the right of that comment. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain fruitful conversation.

Latest Articles